What killing the Mobility Fee Moratorium means for you

Published On: Nov 01 2012 01:05:22 PM EDT
MeroJacksonville explores potential capital improvement projects that the mobility fee is designed to bring to each Jacksonville neighborhood .


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Mobility Zone Nine

Outside of downtown (Mobility Zone 10), Mobility Zone 9 covers the "Inner Northside". It is a zone with a functional gridded street system, a significant amount of historic building fabric, and many of its residents are transit dependent. Many neighborhoods in this zone have struggled to attract infill and economic redevelopment over the last six decades. Neighborhoods in this zone include Panama Park, Eastside, Springfield, New Springfield, Brentwood, Moncrief, New Town, Durkeeville, and Soutel. Split by a major CSX rail line, it is also home to older sections of the Westside and attractions such as the Jacksonville Farmer's Market. Westside neighborhoods in this zone include North Riverside, Lackawanna, and Commonwealth. A financial benefit of the mobility fee and its supportive land use policies, is that it drives market rate redevelopment into areas of town that can support the added density and additional job creation.

Mobility Zone 9 Priority Capital Improvement Project

Commuter Rail North (Transit) - Downtown to Trout River and eventually Airport Center Drive - $31 million (25% local match)


Other Mobility Zone 9 Roadway and Transit Capital Improvement Projects

  • Streetcar North - High frequency transit service between Downtown and Shands Jacksonville via Main and 8th Streets - $21 million
  • New Kings Road - Construction of right turn lanes from Soutel Drive to Edgewood Avenue - $1 million
  • Old Kings Road - Intersection Improvements between Edgewood Avenue and Plummer Road (incl. Dunn Avenue to US 1) - $12 million


Mobility Zone 9 Bicycle Projects

  • Laura Street - Pavement markings and signage between Bay and 8th Streets - $0.51 million
  • Newnan/Hubbard Street - Pavement markings and signage between Bay and 8th Streets - $0.52 million
  • Laura Street/12th Street - Pavement markings and signage between 8th Street and S-Line Urban Greenway - $0.25 million
  • Kings Road - Bicycle lanes or pavement markings and signage between S-Line Urban Greenway and Martha Street - $0.79 million
  • Dunn Avenue - Bicycle lanes between Biscayne Avenue and Main Street - $0.57 million
  • Forest Street - Bicycle lanes or pavement markings and signage between Edison Avenue and McCoys Creek Boulevard - $0.23 million
  • McCoys Creek Boulevard - Multi Use Path or pavement markings and signage between Forest Street and Leland Street - $0.05 million
  • McCoys Creek Boulevard - Multi Use Path or pavement markings and signage between Leland Street and McDuff Avenue - $0.15 million
  • Hubbard Street - Pavement markings and signage between 8th and 14th Streets - $0.16 million
  • Myrtle Avenue - Bicycle lanes or pavement markings and signage between Forest Street and Kings Road - $0.48 million
  • 5th Street - Multi Use Path or pavement markings and signage between Melson Avenue and Lane Avenue - $0.63 million
  • Tallulah Avenue - Bicycle lanes or pavement markings and signage between 68th Street and Main Street - $0.31 million
  • Commonwealth Avenue - Multi Use Path or bicycle lanes between Lane Avenue and Imeson Road - $0.47 million (also in mobility zone 5)
  • Jefferson/Forsyth/Boulevard/Broad Streets - Bicycle lanes along JTA BRT corridor between Water Street and Golfair Boulevard - $1.06 million (also in mobility zone 10)
  • Edgewood Avenue - Convert paved shoulders to bicycle lanes between New Kings Road and Cassat Avenue - $1.19 million
  • Main Street/Commuter Rail North Corridor - Multi Use Path between Main Street and Main Street - $1.69 million
  • Moncrief Road - Bicyle lanes or pavement markings and signage between Golfair Boulevard and 13th Street - $0.43 million
  • Roosevelt Boulevard/Commuter Rail Southwest Corridor - New Multi Use Path between Forest Street and Clay County Line - $3.91 million (also in mobility zone 7)


Mobility Zone 10

Mobility Zone 10 covers downtown Jacksonville. However, downtown is a Transportation Concurrency Exception Area (TCEA) and exempt from the mobility plan.


Pedestrian Projects Throughout City of Jacksonville

In addition to generating revenue for roadway, transit and bicycle capital improvement projects, the Mobility Fee also generates $13.5 million for pedestrian facilities throughout the city. The top priority pedestrian project funded by the Mobility Fee is a pedestrian overpass over the Arlington Expressway between Arlington Road and Regency Square Mall.


What You Can Do?

A bill has recently been submitted to have the mobility fee moratorium extended, despite overwhelming statistics proving this economic development experiment was a floundering failure over the past year. On the other hand, statistics illustrate that the most economic prosperous cities in the country are those that find a way to invest in improving the quality of life for their citizens. Allowing the moratorium to rightfully sunset will place Jacksonville in a position to create additional jobs by investing in itself while also making the streets and mobility options, reliable and safe for all. In addition, ending this subsidy will reduce the tax burden the moratorium has placed on the backs of average everyday residents just trying to survive. 

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