Cops: Man shot, killed after argument

Police say man arrested on murder charge had called to report disturbance

Published On: Jan 30 2013 03:26:40 PM EST   Updated On: Jan 08 2013 05:46:00 PM EST
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

Police say a 52-year-old man shot and killed his longtime friend Monday night during an argument outside a Brierwood apartment.

The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office says 46-year-old Neville Barrett was found dead in the 4700 block of Radcliff Court just after 8 p.m.  Officers arrested Aaron Kaiser and charged him with murder.

"These two individuals knew each other over the past 13 years," said Lt. Rob Schoonover. "For whatever reason, they argued all the time. The suspect admitted to the shooting but would not give us a reason why."

Police said they got three 911 calls about a disturbance at the address -- one from Kaiser (pictured, right) himself asking police to come.  When officers arrived, they found Barrett dead in the street that runs through the complex, off Old Kings Road South near San Clerc Road.

"We asked what the argument was over, he said he didn't remember and said he argued all the time," Schoonover said.

The victim's son said Barrett (family photo, below) stood in front of his church congregation on Sunday urging them to be ready when death comes.

"It's always a concern when you loose your loved ones," Joshua Steward said of his dad. "It's not just affecting the person who died, it's affecting his wife, kids grandkids and the person who pulled the trigger, (his) wife and grandkids as well."

Steward said nothing could prepare the family for his father's sudden death.

"Anytime you get around him, his No. 1 goal was to make you smile and enjoying life," Steward said.

This was the Jacksonville's fourth homicide so far in 2013, and all have occurred in the past five days.  There were 15 homicides in Jacksonville in December.

"The violence has spiked in the last month. I don't have a reason for it," Schoonover said.

Channel 4 crime expert Ken Jefferson says crime seems like it's on the rise because, culturally, far too many people have no regard for another person's life.

"People in the community are concerned, and they have the right to be concerned because the violence is all around them," Jefferson said.

Jefferson said the solution is to bridge the gap between the communities that are grieving and police.

"I understand that you have calls for service and answer those, but you have to go out and meet the people you are serving," Jefferson said.