An ATM that will wish you a happy birthday, sell you stamps and still spit out the money you need?  It exists and there's more.

"Being able to choose what language you would like to be served in, you are able to choose how you'd like your receipt. You can order checks, you can even set an appointment for a personal banker to give you a call, um, all from the ATM," said Karmon Clay with Wells Fargo.

How about a live, remote video teller?   And though it's not in use quite yet, the technology exists to use your smart phone instead of a bank card.

Not just that, inside some banks and credit unions you may find special new pin pads that essentially transform the teller line to self service, too.

"Think of it as like the airline. Think how much faster you get thru the line at the airline now as opposed to what you did in the past but there's always someone there in case you need assistance at the airline counter and the same is true of financial institutions," said Doug Johnson with the American Bankers Association.

So, instead of filling out a deposit or withdrawal slip and digging out your account numbers, all that info is fed right to the teller.

"What the customer does is just presents their ATM card at the pin pad, they swipe the card similar to the ATM, enter their PIN number and all their information flows to the teller screen," explained Clay.

Banks and credit unions love it because it not only cuts back on costs, but frees the teller up for real conversations about other services that could bring more money in the door.

Some people aren't eager to embrace technology, especially when it comes to their money. And banking leaders want them to know the teller isn't going to disappear entirely, at least not any time soon.

"If an individual wants to use a teller line, an individual can use the teller and have that human contact. We just want to make sure that all the options are available," said Johnson.

Even the banks with video tellers are still offering the option of using the traditional tellers, too, at this point.  The American Bankers Association pointed out to us that often it's the larger banks that deploy this kind of technology, but in this case, many smaller banks and credit unions are signing on just as quickly.