Duval County reports 5 new cases of West Nile virus

20 cases in 2012 equals number of patients from all of last year

Published On: Sep 05 2012 12:06:02 PM EDT   Updated On: Sep 05 2012 12:10:26 PM EDT
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

The Duval County Health Department reports five additional cases of West Nile virus in Jacksonville last week, bringing the number to 20 -- the total number of cases reported in all of last year.

The most recent cases reported on Tuesday involve a 56-year-old man, two women aged 55, along with 61- and 71-year-old women.

Last year, two Jacksonville patients died with the disease. A patient in Glynn County, Ga., also died of the virus.

West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne illness and is not spread from person to person. There is no specific medication or vaccine for the virus.

About one in 150 people infected with West Nile will develop severe illness. Symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.

Earlier this month the Health Department has issued a mosquito-borne illness alert for Duval County, and officials said there is a heightened concern that more residents will become ill.

The city's Mosquito Control Division is urging everyone to help prevent breeding by draining standing water.

Florida Department of Health laboratories provide testing services for physicians treating patients with clinical signs of mosquito-borne disease.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, you should remember "Drain and Cover."

Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying.

Cover skin with clothing or repellent.

Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house. Repair broken screening on windows, doors, porches and patios.

Always read label directions carefully for the approved usage before you apply a repellent. Some repellents are not suitable for children.

Products with concentrations of up to 30 percent DEET are generally recommended. Other U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved repellents contain picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or IR3535. These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredients to be listed on the product label.

Apply insect repellent to exposed skin or onto clothing, but not under clothing.

In protecting children, read label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropriate. According to the CDC, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of 3. DEET is not recommended on children younger than 2 months old.

Avoid applying repellents to the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent first to their own hands and then transfer it to the child's skin and clothing.

If additional protection is necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your clothing. Again, always follow the manufacturer's directions.

The Florida Department of Health said it continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito-borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds via the website for Surveillance of Wild-bird Die-offs located at www.myfwc.com/bird/.

For more information on mosquito-borne illnesses, visit DOH's Environmental Public Health website at www.doh.state.fl.us/Environment/medicine/arboviral/index.html or call your DCHD at 904-253-1850.