Holmes showing hostile jail behavior

CO shooting suspect spitting on guards, asking questions and complaining about food

Published On: Jul 30 2012 10:34:33 PM EDT   Updated On: Jul 31 2012 11:03:46 AM EDT

Two federal lawmakers say they don't want anyone to ever be able to buy so much ammunition online again. This is after the movie theater shooting massacre in Aurora, Colorado that killed 12 and left 58 others injured.

Monday a bill was introduced that would stop people like shooting suspect James Holmes from purchasing thousands of rounds on the internet, or by mail.

Holmes is accused of carrying out the theater massacre in Colorado.

Here's what the bill would require:

- Only licensed dealers would be allowed to sell ammunition.
- The dealers would have to notify law enforcement within five days about any sale of more than 1,000 rounds to an unlicensed person.
- The proposal would also require unlicensed dealers to show a photo ID to buy ammunition which means they would have to make the purchase in person.

Colorado police said Holmes bought 6,000 rounds of ammunition online in the weeks before the shooting. Monday, the 24 year old was in court, charged with 142 counts.

During his last hearing, Holmes appeared dazed and out of it, raising questions about his mental health.

Victim's family members said they saw a completely different Holmes in court Monday, describing him as alert and sane.

But behind bars, a contradiction -- officials said he's been combative, confused and is claiming he doesn't remember a thing about the night of the shooting.

"He is deeply disturbed," Psychiatrist Dr. Carl Burak said of Holmes.

Spitting at prison guards, asking why he's behind bars and complaining about the food. That's just some of the new information coming out about accused Colorado shooter, James Holmes.

"His behavior in jail is way out of the ordinary," Burak said.

Psychiatrist Carl Burak has never treated Holmes, but said based on the evidence so far, it's likely the 24-year-old could suffer from schizophrenia or mutliple-personality disorder and appears to be acting out, because he's confused and delusional.

"He may have felt that people had turned against him," Burak said. "That they were conspiring. He was getting messages."

The former Colorado doctoral student was formally charged with 142 counts in court Monday afternoon. Cameras were not allowed inside.

But the gallery's 120 seats were filled with victims and their family members who wanted to see and judge Holmes' demeanor for themselves.

"I got a sense that he was very aware of what was going on," Mary Ellen hansen said. Ellen's neice was one of the shooting victims. "I do not believe he is insane but of course I'm not a psychiatrist. He responded very appropriately."

Despite speculation Holmes could be "faking" his odd behavior to somehow leverage an insanity defense, Burak said until a full psychological profile is complete, it's too early to know.

"You can have put together a situation where he is irrational and psychotic but knows right from wrong and can be devious," Burak said.

A status hearing has been set for August 9th in the case.

Holmes is being held in solitary confinement and has been fitted with a plastic face guard to keep him from spitting on corrections officers.