JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

The future of the Defense of Marriage Act, popularly referred to as DOMA, is still being discussed in the higher courts.

Five Supreme Court justices made statements during oral arguments that they would potentially support overturning the law that makes gay marriage illegal.

"It's extremely exciting, nerve-wracking. There's a lot at stake," said B.J. Douglass. "Obviously, lesbian and gay couples across the country, we feel our rights are hanging in the balance."

"I'm definitely excited and my family is so supportive," said Connie Valois.

The news that some of the justices are in favor of changing DOMA makes, Douglass and Valois are hopeful for the future.

Valois and Douglass, a lesbian couple, were married in 2008 and face everyday struggles because their marriage is not recognized by the federal government.

"Our poor accountant is hoping DOMA is struck down because we had to file three different tax returns because we're legally married in New York, but for federal purposes, we're single and it's just very confusing," said Douglass.

Not everyone thinks changing the definition of marriage in America is a good thing.

Mike Day just returned from Washington, D.C. Day runs the Catholic Family Life Center in Riverside and headed to Washington with a dozen other local people who joined thousands of protestors on both sides.

"I appreciate that there is discussion going on about this because I think there are some questions that need to be answered on both sides about what marriage is," said Day.

Day said it's good America is debating the issue, but he feels it's in the country's best interest to keep the traditional marriage roles as that of a man and a woman.

"There is a way in that heterosexual relationships are unique in that it's the only relationship that actually creates a life that personifies that love," said Day. "Nothing else is like that and as far as children, nothing is better for that child than having that relationship between a mother and a father."