Teen's killing comes up in gun control debate

NBC Sports announcer Bob Costas advocates gun control during broadcast

Published On: Dec 03 2012 03:42:33 PM EST   Updated On: Dec 03 2012 09:00:17 PM EST
Jordan Davis
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

It seems to always happen after high-profile shooting deaths in the U.S. Inevitably, the debate over gun control will start back up.

On Sunday night, NBC Sports announcer Bob Costas commented on the recent murder-suicide of Kansas City Chiefs football player Jovan Belcher and his girlfriend.

Costas also made reference to the recent killing of Jacksonville teen Jordan Davis after an argument over loud music at a Southside gas station.

"'But here,' wrote (Kansas City sports writer) Jason Whitlock, 'is what I believe. If Jovan Belcher didn't possess a gun, he and Cassandra Perkins would both be alive today,'" Costas said during halftime of NBC's "Sunday Night Football," agreeing with Whitlock.

RELATED: Should Bob Costas have spoken out on Belcher suicide?

Davis' father, Ron Davis, has also spoken out about his desire to change gun laws in this country.

Guns are a part of the culture and some believe an inherent right for American citizens. A billboard on St. Augustine Road in Jacksonville is currently advertising a gun show coming later this month.

And with all this, the debate over gun control is heating back up.

Inside the St. Nicholas Gun and Sporting Goods shop, opinions are what you might expect from people who are looking to buy firearms.

"It's people that kill other people, not the guns. That's for sure," said Don Newton, who supports the Second Amendment.

"The biggest thing we need to address is the incivility that has over taken our country," gun owner Tom McGuire said. "There is so much hatred that has come about because of this political process. Guns just naturally come out because people are so angry."

Jordan Davis and Michael Dunn Davis' father talked about anger when he referenced the man police say killed his son over loud music: Michael Dunn is accused of firing into the 17-year-old's SUV eight or nine times. Davis says he wants to spend the rest of his years advocating stricter gun laws.

"It's going to be my business, my platform to getting guns off the streets and getting that law reversed. In this case, the gentleman I think is filled with anger," Davis said. "That he was angry because he told my son and the kids in the car to turn the music down. He was angry they didn't listen to him."

"Let there be no mistake: I am a wrongful death lawyer, and this is the most wrongful death I've ever seen in my entire career," Davis family attorney John Phillips said in a phone interview Monday.

Phillips said Ron Davis is considering how to tackle one of the most divisive and controversial issues in the country.

"It's a huge battle to take on the Second Amendment and really affect change," Phillips said. "But if you can do that person by person, there is a butterfly effect from Jordan's death, and I think that's where this family wants to go."

Phillips said he thought Costas went a little over the top with his commentary, but he said as long as the gun debate continues in an educational way and not in a derogatory way, he believes it's healthy discourse to have.