When you ask 8-year-old T'darius Reed about his favorite subject in school, he'll talk about science. It's easy to understand why.

"I like to make potions," said Reed.

But it was his least favorite subject that got him into this chair and to the woman on the other side of the screen. Meet miss Lillian Bittaye.

"From being in the classroom, I found that there were children who still weren't meeting the standards and could use some extra help," said Lillian Bittaye, Founder of Let The Children Live.

That extra help came in the form of a webcam.

"It's fascinating to them when they realize it. (For them) It's like their on TV," Bittaye said.

Bettye's teaching software is… herself. During the one-hour lesson, she helps with everything from math to reading by interacting live with students.

According to the Center on Education Policy, 48 percent of the nation's 100,000 public schools were labeled as failing under the law last year. Bittaye says thinking outside the box is the first step towards change.

"We have to find better ways, different ways of being able to continue to capture their interest and to keep them learning," Bittaye said.

With the help of sponsors, she's able to buy and install webcams for students that can't afford them.

"I'd like to be able to do a technology summer camp and involve the science, technology, engineering and mathematics," Bittaye said. "I truly believe that no child should be left behind but if we don't get behind them and keep pushing, we are going to lose a whole lot of them."

Bittaye is giving kids like Reed a chance to become real rocket scientists.  She  currently has 10 volunteers, including certified teachers. The sessions costs $15 an hour but if parents can't afford it, she says she will find a way to foot the bill.

This project is part of her non-profit organization that's been helping children thrive for 14 years. For more information on the program go to www.letthechildrenlive.net.