Jacksonville is a community at a crossroads. According to Transportation for America, Jacksonville is the 3rd most dangerous city in the country for pedestrians and cyclist.

A lack of interest in preserving our culture and historical heritage has been a major contributor to many neighborhoods being erased from existence and our downtown becoming a shell of its former self.

Despite having 747 square miles of land within our borders, many of our suburban areas are falling into decline as sprawl development pushes outward into neighboring counties. However, things were not always this way. Our progressive African-American community was instrumental in paving the way for the Harlem Renaissance.


Our neighborhoods were connected with each other by the state's largest rail-based streetcar system. A 61-mile system that carried more passengers annually in 1912, than JTA does today county-wide.

A place where the maritime industry met the railroad, downtown Jacksonville was a major logistics center for the distribution of goods, people and supplies throughout the east coast.

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