"There were not a lot of contentious bills, they were not all that controversial, there were just some contentious people," Hammer said.

Besides the opposition to "docs and glocks," most of the gun related controversy in recent sessions has been through failed efforts by advocates seeking to repeal the 2005 "stand your ground" law, which says people can use deadly force and do not have a duty to retreat if they think it is necessary to prevent death or great bodily harm

The so-called "warning shot" law approved this year modified "stand your ground" by extending immunity to those who threaten to use force in self-defense.

In addition to "docs vs. glocks," a law that restricts how doctors can talk to patients about guns, the 2011 laws signed by Scott included another one that continues to be challenged by cities and counties. That bill established $5,000 fines for county and city officials who enforce local firearms restrictions and empowered the governor to remove local officials from office if they continued to defy the state law.

In June, a judge sided with Palm Beach County against the provision that the governor could remove a county official from office for trying to enforce local gun control rules.

Not all of the gun laws have received universal praise from gun-rights advocates.

An NRA-backed measure Scott signed in 2013, crafted in the wake of 20 children and six adults being gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., was narrowly-focused on making it harder for the mentally ill to buy guns.

However, the issue put Scott in the crosshairs of two out-of-state groups.

The Colorado-based National Association for Gun Rights and the Virginia-based Gun Owners of America argued that the law -- which blocks firearms purchases by some people who voluntarily admit themselves for mental-health treatment -- would discourage people with mental illnesses from seeking treatment.

In a letter accompanying the bill signing, Scott noted that the measure was the product of mental-health and gun-rights advocates; he also highlighted his history of support for gun rights.

"During the 2012 GOP Convention, I was asked to issue a temporary executive order to override laws that allow people to carry concealed weapons, which I denied because it was unclear how disarming law-abiding citizens would better protect them from the damages and threats posed by those who would flout the law," Scott wrote. "Additionally, I've signed legislation protecting the privacy of firearm owners and stopping local governments from overreaching in the regulation of firearms."