(CNN) -

A nun, a leading AIDS researcher, an international athlete and a family traveling on summer vacation.

The victims aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 came from around the world and held a wide range of hopes and dreams.

Their stories are being shared online, in traditional media and among friends and loved ones of passengers aboard the Boeing 777, which was shot down by unknown attackers Thursday in a rebel-controlled part of eastern Ukraine.

Malaysia Airlines on Saturday issued its latest list of the 298 people aboard doomed Flight MH17, which was shot down in eastern Ukraine. There were 193 Dutch citizens -- the most of any nation -- on the flight from Amsterdam, Netherlands, to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The other people came from around the world.

Forty-three were from Malaysia, including 15 crew and two infants; 27 were from Australia; 12 were from Indonesia; 10 were from the United Kingdom, including one dual UK/South African citizen; four were from Germany; four were from Belgium, three were from the Philippines; and one was from Canada.

Included in the Dutch toll was the lone American, who had dual Dutch-U.S. citizenship.

Malaysia Airlines listed one passenger as being from New Zealand, but the airline's count did not mention one Hong Kong passenger included in earlier tallies.

Karlijn Keijzer

Karlijn Keijzer, 25, was a champion rower from Amsterdam who had showed passion and leadership in the United States as a member of the team at Indiana University in Bloomington. The blond Dutch chemistry student with an infectious smile left behind a team of friends, many of whom will remember her for a lifetime.

"She was so intelligent and such a hard worker. But rowing was her passion," said teammate Kelly Bainbridge. Keijzer rowed on the team's fastest boat crew, where she showed leadership and a technique that Bainbridge described as "pristine."

Her accomplishments included racing in the European Rowing Junior Championships in 2006 and the World Rowing Junior Championships in 2007.

"She was bold. She said everything like she wanted to say. She was direct. And she was beautiful inside and out. And she was brilliant," teammate Catherine Campbell told CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360."

Keijzer was traveling with her boyfriend, Laurens van der Graaff.

"They had a love that few find in this lifetime," Campbell said.

She was driven and a hard worker, but she never lost sight of who she was, friends said. In the gym during weight training, "if someone was having a tough day, she would give them a pat on the back," said Bainbridge. She also had a refreshing sense of humor. With a tip of the hat to Indiana's farmland culture, Keijzer showed up at a team party dressed as an ear of corn.

"I feel like so much of the media coverage focuses on nationalities," Bainbridge said. This tragedy, she said, transcends that. "For us, it wasn't about where you're from. We were like family."

A former roommate said she was the most genuine person she had ever met.

"If you were worrying about something that you should not be worrying about, or if you were obsessing over something that was not a big deal, she was going to tell you to lighten up," Rachel Weigler said. "You know, she just wanted you to love life."

Fatima Dyczynski