Aerospace engineer Fatima Dyczynski was founder of the high-tech startup Xoterra Space in the Netherlands. The company website described her as a "thought leader, scientist, creative space enthusiast, motivated entrepreneur, public speaker, all world traveler and absolute futurist."

Her parents were having a hard time accepting that she had been killed.

"Our daughter is a survivor," her mother, Angela Rudhart-Dyczynsk, told CNN's "Erin Burnett OutFront."

Their daughter was innovative and creative, she said.

"We believe she was the face of the young generation," Rudhart-Dyczynsk told CNN.

Dyczynski also was CEO and project manager of Xoterra.

"We are very grieved by the loss of the founder of Xoterra Space, Fatima Dyczynski, who passed away in flight MH17 to Kuala Lumpur," the company said in a statement. "Fatima was energetic, full of life and her dreams reached to the outermost of space. She was brightly outspoken, ambitious and incredibly motivated. Many people were inspired by her dreams to make space personal and her passion for innovation and business."

Pim de Kuijer

Dutch passenger Pim de Kuijer was on his way to an International AIDS Conference in Australia -- a trip that was to be followed by a backpacking excursion there, according to his Facebook page.

It was one of many overseas trips the 32-year-old had taken in his life. In addition to his work as an AIDS campaigner, de Kuijer had also worked as an elections observer in Egypt and posted pictures to his Facebook in May of elections there. He had also previously covered elections in Ukraine, according to Channel 4 News.

"He devoted his life to trying to change the world around him for the better," his brother Paul de Kuijer told CNN on Monday. "He used to work on democratization projects in Sierra Leone, Malaysia, Russia and Ukraine, as well."

He said that the reactions to his brother's death told him more about the man.

"I now know he touched so many lives and he was in fact maybe a remarkable person," Paul de Kuijer said.

His brother always believed that dialogue was the key to solving crises such as the one in Ukraine.

"The last thing he would have wanted is his death or even the tragic incident that caused his death to contribute to even a more difficult situation there in the conflict," Paul de Kuijer said.

The day of the crash, de Kuijer posted to his Facebook page a picture of him posing beneath aviator sunglasses and sporting a large travelers' backpack. Well-wishers' comments turned from excitement, to panic, to devastation as the Facebook community learned of the downed MH17 and the passengers aboard.

"I still can't get my head around the fact that he was killed," wrote one friend. "Pim believed in understanding between countries, the rule of law and equality for all and fought for his values through his work and his political activities. Let's try to live up his legacy and work even harder towards a peaceful world."

Cameron Dalziel

His brother-in-law, Shane Hattingh, told CNN that Dalziel really was "larger than life."

"I know everybody says that," Hattingh said, "He's what I called a high-value South African ... citizen. Wherever he went in the world people were like, this is someone to be reckoned with."