'Nothing was weird'


Meanwhile, when the boy's mother, Leanna Harris, arrived at a day care center to pick the boy up, employees there told her Cooper had never been dropped off, the detective said.

"Ross must have left him in the car," she replied, according to Stoddard. Witnesses said they tried to tell her many other things could have happened, but Leanna Harris insisted that Ross Harris must have left the boy in the car, Stoddard said.

The detective also said that when Ross and Leanna Harris were in an interview room, Ross Harris told his wife that Cooper looked "peaceful" and that his eyes were closed when he was removed from the vehicle. He told his wife, "I dreaded how he would look," Stoddard said, noting how Harris had used the past tense.

The detective added that the boy's eyes and mouth were not closed when he was taken out of the SUV.

At one point in the interview room, Stoddard said, Leanna Harris asked her husband about what he had said to police.

"She asked him -- she had him sit down, and he starts going through this. And she looks at him, and she's like, 'Well, did you say too much?' " the detective testified.

Ross Harris was scheduled to meet friends for a 5 p.m. showing of the movie "22 Jump Street," Stoddard said, but he told them he'd be late. He left work at 4:16 p.m., and it would have taken him about 10 minutes to get to the theater, the detective said.

James Alex Hall, who worked with Ross Harris and had run a Web development company with him for the past two or three months, said Harris didn't act out of the ordinary on the day his son died.

"I would say normal as you could be. Nothing stuck out. Nothing was weird," Hall said.

When Harris didn't show up 30 minutes into the movie, Hall stepped outside to contact him. Harris didn't respond to texts, and phone calls went straight to his voicemail, Hall said.

Asked whether Harris was a guy who talked about how life might be without a child, Hall said he was the opposite: the kind of dad who talked about his kid to the point that people were tired of hearing about it.

"He said he loved his son all the time," Hall said.

'It's easy to get distracted'


On cross-examination, a prosecutor asked Hall whether he was aware of allegations that Ross Harris had been sexting various women. Hall replied no and conceded that, if that were true, he didn't know everything about his friend.

Stoddard testified that messages between the Harrises indicate that the two were having financial problems. Ross Harris had recently been passed over for a promotion, and the couple had two insurance policies on Cooper, one for $2,000 and one for $25,000, Stoddard said.

The detective also expressed concern that Harris had a "second life he's living, with alternate personalities and alternate personas."

Dozens of reporters and spectators showed up before the hearing began. Leanna Harris held another woman's hand and appeared emotional when her husband was brought into the courtroom in an orange prison jumpsuit.

Defense attorney H. Maddox Kilgore said after several witnesses testified that he didn't feel anything presented at Thursday's hearing indicated that Ross Harris intentionally left Cooper in the car, which would be key to finding him guilty on the charges.

"It's not even criminal negligence enough to support a misdemeanor," he told the judge, asking him to dismiss the warrant. "Ross pulled out of a Chick-fil-A, and his mind went elsewhere. It's easy to get distracted when you get behind the wheel. Everyone does it."