MIDDLEBURG, Fla. -

The house where Clay County Detective David White was shot and killed during a raid on a meth lab last year was covered with graffiti over the weekend.

Deputies called to investigate criminal mischief at the house on Alligator Boulevard about 3:30 a.m. Monday found the unoccupied house covered with "Aryan nation graffiti."

Deputies said swastikas, German SS symbols and "R.I.P. Tedd Tilley" were spray painted in red were fresh -- the paint still tacky to the touch.

Tilley was shot and killed Feb. 16, 2012, as he tried to exit the house after fatally shooting White and injuring White's partner, Detective Matt Hanlin.

The four suspects in the White's murder -- Ryan Wilder, Jennifer Alder, Chastity Prescott and Jerry Daniels -- are scheduled for trial in February.  Prosecutors say all four were in the house during the raid and shootings.

Wilder, Alder and Prescott are all charged with felony first-degree murder and several counts of attempted murder. Daniels is charged with third-degree murder. All are charged with drug possession.

Clay County deputies are attempting to contact the owner of the Alligator Boulevard house and said the criminal investigation into who painted the graffiti on the house was continuing. Investigators said Tilley was involved in a gang named Aryan Brotherhood, and they believe that may be the same gang that spray painted the home.

Capt. Barry Abramowitz was part of the meth lab raid the night White was killed.

"I think about him every day, I think about his family, I think about his parents, I think about what he left behind," Abramowitz said. "The problem is, although we are sensitive to it, we have a job to do."

Neighbors are upset by what they see and call it a disgrace.

"Most people when they think of Middleburg they think of a small town, family feel," Karen Hunt said. "Middleburg is not about violence and meth labs."

But the few who represent the insulting vandalism will never outweigh the outpouring of support the community has shown throughout the last couple years to White's family and the Clay County Sheriff's Office.

"There's sorrow in my heart, there's sorrow in everybody's heart here, and there's sorrow in the community's hearts," Abramowitz said. "We can't stop doing what we're paid to do and what we're supposed to do for the community."