JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

In the first day of testimony in the trial of Michael Dunn, a man who fatally shot a 17-year-old teen during an argument over loud music outside a Southside convenience store, prosecutors have the burden of proof.

One side said it's clear what happened and who should pay. The other, believes "not guilty" is the only verdict that will be read.

Channel 4 went to a local attorney to talk about the process and about the specifics from the first day in court.

"But if the state can prove what they brought out in opening statement, I don't think the state will have a problem in getting a conviction. That's my belief," said criminal defense attorney Dexter Van Davis.

"Bullets, nine of them, came crashing through the glass and metal surrounding them," said Assistant State Attorney John Guy in court Thursday.

"As Mr. Guy put it, real life inconsistencies happen every day. Well, every day, people aren't on trial for a crime he didn't commit," defense attorney for Michael Dunn, Cory Strolla said to the court Thursday.

Davis told Channel 4 that the defense strategy Dunn's lawyer used in day one was to point out what investigators didn't do. It's a strategy that Davis, at the end of the day, doesn't think will work if the prosecution can prove what they claim they can.

"You've got to give them a road map, tell them what you're going to do. He (Strolla) did a good job showing the state didn't do certain things, how they waited to look at (the) car, four days later at what they say was a gun maybe," said Davis. "He did a good job of that, I think, and that's all he can do: hammer at what they didn't do, hammer what (the) state didn't do, police didn't do. To me, that's probably all he's got is what they didn't do."

Seven witnesses appeared once opening statements concluded Thursday. All of them talked about what they saw or heard, when and where, the night Jordan Davis was killed. Dunn's lawyer cross-examined each of them, looking for details that may have been different than previous witness statements.

Day two of the trial begins at 9 a.m. Friday.