JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

Images of massive protests in Egypt took over television screens Wednesday afternoon after the military announced President Mohammad Morsy had been removed from power. Although thousands of miles separate the United States from Egypt, massive shakeup could impact the U.S.

"It's really tragic hearing all this hope for democracy, the U.S. has tried for that and it's really stalled. The government's made bad decisions. Opposition's made bad decisions, the army's making bad decisions. You expect bumps in the road, but this is headed for major confrontation," said Former UN Ambassador Nancy Soderberg.

Khaled Kamal has lived in Jacksonville since the early 90's, when he moved to the U.S. from Egypt. Kamal told Channel 4 Wednesday night that the chaos in his home country has been going on for years, and was increased in 2011 when Mohammad Morsy unseated former president Hosni Mubarrak in a hotly contested election.  

"I think the Military men are there to prove the national security is covered by military. They are not there to say this is military coup, remember Mubarrak is a military man and he inherited the presidency," said Kamal. 

Since Morsy won the election his approval ratings have plummeted and Egypt's economy has continued to struggleKamal said he's constantly talking to family and friends back home about how they feel.  

"If you live in a dictatorship, you get used to the fact that anything can happen. Your sense of security is not there anymore because you know it can go at any time," said Kamal.  

Soderberg said that the controversy has been going on for some 40 years, and she added, if people think these are problems that are a half world away, Americans could see it hit closer to home in the future gas prices and global stability as a whole.