"If he's given 60 years in prison and none of the charges are overturned on appeal, you are looking at basically life in prison," Strolla said.

Strolla said he plans to appeal based on several issues, including how the jury could reach guilty verdicts on four counts and deadlock on another.

Jurors heard testimony that Dunn, who has a concealed weapons permit, fired 10 shots, hitting the SUV nine times. Davis was the only person hit.

Dunn, in claiming self-defense, testified that he thought he saw a firearm pointed at him from the boys' SUV as the argument escalated, but police testified that no weapon was found in the vehicle.  Dunn also told jurors he feared for his life, perceiving "this was a clear and present danger."

Prosecutors contended that Dunn opened fire because he felt disrespected by Davis. The teen made his friend turn the music back up after they initially turned it down at Dunn's request. Dunn was parked in the spot next to the SUV outside the convenience store.

According to authorities, Dunn became enraged about the music and ensuing argument. One person walking out of the convenience store said he heard Dunn say, "You are not going to talk to me like that."

Dunn testified he heard someone in the SUV shouting expletives and the word "cracker," which is a derogatory term for white people.