JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

As the one-year anniversary of the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn. approaches, a new poll reveals a shift in those who support stricter gun control laws.

According to a CNN/ORC international survey, 49 percent of Americans say they support tougher gun control laws, while 50 percent oppose it. That's down 6 percent from 55 percent in January 2013, and 53 percent from April.

The new numbers come on the heels of the release of 911 tapes from the Newtown mass shooting.

According to the poll, geography plays a role in the changing support for gun control.

In the Midwest, there was a 10 point decline and a 15 point drop in urban areas, which greatly impacted the overall national shift. The numbers show the Northeast and West still favor tougher laws.

The poll also finds the intense opinions surrounding the issue, which were once a benefit to advocates, no longer benefits either side. But Eric Friday says he still sees this recent poll a victory.

"When people think about it, especially after things like the anniversaries like Sandy Hook that are coming up, people realize that the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun," Friday said.

The White House has suggested it might try again to push new gun laws again, specifically for increased background checks, but so far there has been little motivation by lawmakers to retry anything in Congress.