ORLANDO, Fla. -

Nolan Wilson, 40, has taken a break from his life on the Nascar racing circuit to market what he calls RFID "Military Grade" wallets and passport billfolds designed to stop high-tech thieves.

WKMG-TV reports the UCF class of '97 communications graduate has the exclusive franchise rights for a special fabric lining sewn in nylon wallets and billfolds.

The items are assembled in Georgia and sold to consumers online and soon in an airport near you.

Wilson said the secret is in the lining.

"It's a metalized fabric that's tuned for that specific application," he said.

The gear is sold under the name Viator Gear. Viator is Latin for traveler.

According to Wilson an Italian company has developed a fabric coating that actually blocks out or shields RFID frequencies sent from chips found in most consumer credit cards and U.S. passports.

The specially treated fabric is used by European and U.S. military units as well as President Barack Obama.

The New York Times recently reported the president and his staff use a fabric security tent while traveling. The Times referred to it as a "portable zone of secrecy."

According to Wilson, that tent is made of the same material used in the Viator Gear inventory.

"When he's (Obama) not in the actual confines of a secure environment they put up a tent made up of our protective armor," he said.

Wilson said he can't talk about the process but says the metallic coating blocks a specific range of signals from unwanted RFID scanners.

Using a small device that scans RFID signals Wilson shows how the small wand beeps and lights up indicating it is receiving an RFID signal. He then places a credit card in one of his fabric-lined wallets and the wand is silent.

The company is starting to expand its stage offering the line of wallets ($60-$75) on ViatorGear.com as well as Amazon.com.

Wilson said InMotion Entertainment, located at airports across the country, plans to add the gear to its line of "technology to go" items in the next few weeks.