Critics of the nation's immigration policy often point to its potential to contribute to voter fraud. With that in mind, here's a a glossary of terms that describe people from other countries who either want to live, or already live, in the United States both legally and illegally, and who counts as a citizen with voting rights.

Citizen

Anyone born in the United States is automatically a U.S. citizen. Naturalized citizens are lawful permanent residents who apply for U.S. citizenship through the naturalization process. To qualify for naturalization, LPRs must reside in the U.S. for at least five years (three if they obtained their green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen) and must not have committed any serious crimes, must show they have paid their taxes, and are of "good moral character." They must also demonstrate a knowledge of U.S. history and government as well as an ability to understand, speak and write English.

A person can register to vote and cast a ballot if they are at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen. Some states have laws that prevent certain categories of criminals from voting. The American Civil Liberties Union compiles a state-by-state database of voter eligibility here.

Asylee

An asylee is a person who has already entered the U.S. and who fears persecution if sent back to his or her home country, and who is applying for asylum in the U.S. To obtain asylum, the individual has to prove that he or she has a "well-founded fear of persecution" on the basis of the person’s race, religion, membership in a social group, political opinion or national origin.

Immigrant/Legal Permanent Resident (LPR)

Under U.S. law, a foreign-born individual who has been admitted to reside permanently in the U.S. is an immigrant and a lawful permanent resident. LPRs are identified by their "green cards."

Naturalized Citizen

Naturalized citizens are lawful permanent residents who apply for U.S. citizenship through the naturalization process. To qualify for naturalization, LPRs must reside in the U.S. for at least five years (three if they obtained their green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen) and must not have committed any serious crimes, must show they have paid their taxes, and are of "good moral character." They must also demonstrate a knowledge of U.S. history and government as well as an ability to understand, speak and write English.

Nonimmigrant

A nonimmigrant is a person who is permitted to enter the United States for a limited period of time but is not admitted for permanent residence.

Refugee

A refugee is a person outside the United States who seeks protection on the grounds that he or she fears persecution. To obtain refugee status, the person has to prove that he or she has a "wellfounded fear of persecution" on the basis of the person’s race, religion, membership in a social group, political opinion or national origin.

Illegal Immigrant

An illegal immigrant is a person who is residing in the United States without the permission of the U.S. government. Illegal immigrants enter the U.S. either illegally, without being inspected by an immigration officer or by using false documents, or legally, with a temporary visa and then remain in the U.S. after the visa has expired.

Sources: National Council of La Raza, American Civil Liberties Uniono counts as a citizen with voting rights.