"They were definitely more physical than last year," Mingo said.

The Gators ran the ball on their final 25 snaps, gashing the Tigers between the tackles.

"Them boys was huffing and puffing," Easley said. "I was looking in people's eyes and they were scared. That's what we wanted. We wanted to take somebody's will. We like to take people's will, not just win the game. Make them remember this night."

Maybe the play of the game came between those game-changing, run-oriented drives. Elam stripped Odell Beckham Jr. following a 56-yard reception on third down.

Initially, the officials ruled Beckham was down when the ball came out. Replays, though, clearly showed the ball coming out before his knee hit the ground. The play was reversed, and Florida seized the momentum.

"It was a hustle play," Elam said. "It was all instinct. It was great effort that paid off."

Florida was so dominant that it could have posted a second consecutive shutout at home. But two seemingly silly plays helped LSU get points.

Bostic, who was a key cog in stuffing LSU's run, was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct on the game's opening drive. Instead of facing third-and-17, LSU got 15 yards and an automatic first down. It set up Drew Alleman's 31-yard field goal.

Alleman added a 21-yarder just before halftime as LSU capitalized on Jeff Driskel's fumble. Driskel, who completed 8 of 12 passes for 61 yards, held the ball too long and then fumbled while trying to scramble away from Bennie Logan. Guard James Wilson had a shot at the loose ball but whiffed.

Mingo eventually came up with it, setting LSU's offense up at the 7-yard line.

Florida's defense made a stand, though, and forced the chip shot.

"That was typical 1980 SEC right there today," Muschamp said. "It was a physical, physical match. ... That's the difference between playing in this league and these other leagues you watch on TV. I know you guys like all these points being scored, but the quarterback won't make it through the season in our league."