JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

The remnants of Tropical Storm Dorian, now a trough of low pressure north of Puerto Rico, is being given only a 30 percent chance of redeveloping into a tropical system over the next 48 hours.

At 2 p.m. Monday, the National Hurricane Center said an Air Force reconnaissance aircraft did not find a closed center of circulation -- necessary to be classified as a tropical system -- and the lowest surface pressures are well removed from the main area of thunderstorms.

The system continues moving west to west-northwest. Showers and gusty winds to near gale force in squalls are expected to stay well to the north of Puerto Rico on Monday and could spread across the Turks and Caicos Islands and portions of the Bahamas over the next couple of days.

Dorian earned its name early last week as it moved west from the Cape Verde Islands. The storm peaked at 60 mph on Thursday, but nearly dissipated by the weekend.

"We may be dodging the bullet when it comes to a mid-season rash of strong tropical storms," Channel 4 hurricane expert George Winterling wrote on his Eye on the Storm blog. "So far we are just having a much longer time to prepare for a possible big one. Enjoy your summer while we continue to look for anything out there."