Is this the best anti-aging diet?

Mediterranean-style diet could hold the key to the Fountain of Youth

By Melanie Lawson - The Morning Show anchor, Consumer Reports

The secret to living longer and looking younger could be an easy recipe. 

A new study once again confirmed that a Mediterranean-style diet is king when it comes to both. It continues to be the winner for battling heart disease and it might help you age more gracefully in general.

According to Consumer Reports, the Italian study looked at 5,200 people ages 65 and older and found those who most closely followed a Mediterranean-style diet were 25 percent less likely to die over eight years than others who did not. 

The health article that appeared in the December 2018 issue of Consumer Reports magazine said, "This eating style may delay the aging process by helping to protect the DNS in cells from damage."

A Mediterranean-style diet is described as being rich in produce, fish, beans, nuts, olive oil and whole grains, and low in meat and dairy.

Here's a breakdown of some of the foods you want to make sure you frequently eat: 

Olive oil high in antioxidants lower your risk for cancer, chronic disease and even memory loss.

Blueberries. packed with fiber and vitamin C, protect against aging, heart disease and diabetes.

Nuts and seeds lower your risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. They can also help repair skin tissue and retain skin moisture.

Leafy greens protect your bones, fight inflammatory diseases and keep your digestive system running smoothly.

Yogurt rich in probiotics, which benefit your digestive system and strengthen your immune system.

Water keeps you hydrated, your mind sharp and perks up your mood.

The author of this latest study, which appeared in the Aug. 30 British Journal of Nutrition, noted that several other previous studies had similar results -- so take it for what it's worth. Some small changes might be the key to a real-life Fountain of Youth.

All Consumer Reports material Copyright 2018 Consumer Reports, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Consumer Reports is a not-for-profit organization which accepts no advertising. It has no commercial relationship with any advertiser or sponsor on this site. For more information visit consumer.org.