School boards continue battle over controversial law

By The News Service of Florida

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - School boards from across the state have gone to the 1st District Court of Appeal as they continue to challenge a controversial 2017 law that includes steps to boost charter schools.

Eleven districts signed on to notices filed last week indicating they will appeal an April 17 ruling by Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper that upheld the law.

As is common, the notices do not detail the arguments the school boards will make at the Tallahassee-based appeals court.

The legal battle centers on a measure, commonly known as HB 7069, that was a priority of House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O’ Lakes, and became one of most-controversial issues of the 2017 legislative session.

The wide-ranging law included changes such as requiring county school boards to share local property-tax revenues with charter schools for building-related expenses.

It also set the stage for adding new charter schools -- dubbed “schools of hope” -- that will serve students whose traditional public schools have been considered low-performing.

School boards filed the lawsuit last year arguing, at least in part, that HB 7069 infringed on their constitutional authority to operate public schools within their districts.

But Cooper rejected the school boards’ arguments.

One notice of appeal was filed last week by the school boards in Alachua, Bay, Broward, Hamilton, Lee, Orange, Pinellas, Polk, St. Lucie and Volusia counties, according to documents posted on the Leon County clerk of courts website.

Another notice was filed by the Collier County School Board, which intervened in the case after it was originally filed in circuit court.

News Service of Florida