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Not on your life: FDA warns against using malaria drug to battle COVID-19

FILE - This Monday, April 6, 2020, file photo shows an arrangement of Hydroxychloroquine pills in Las Vegas. At least 13 states have obtained a total of more than 10 million doses of malaria drugs to treat COVID-19 patients despite warnings from doctors that more tests are needed before the medications that President Trump once fiercely promoted should be used to help people with the coronavirus. (AP Photo/John Locher,File)
FILE - This Monday, April 6, 2020, file photo shows an arrangement of Hydroxychloroquine pills in Las Vegas. At least 13 states have obtained a total of more than 10 million doses of malaria drugs to treat COVID-19 patients despite warnings from doctors that more tests are needed before the medications that President Trump once fiercely promoted should be used to help people with the coronavirus. (AP Photo/John Locher,File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – The verdict is in about a treatment for COVID-19 repeatedly mentioned by President Donald Trump at official briefings of the White House Coronavirus Task Force.

The Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning against the use of two related drugs approved to treat a malaria drug that Trump repeatedly called “game changers” in the fight against coronavirus.

After U.S. veterans hospitals reported there were more deaths among coronavirus disease patients treated with the malaria drug than versus standard

A malaria drug widely touted by President Donald Trump for treating the new coronavirus showed no benefit in a large analysis of its use in U.S. veterans hospitals. In fact, there were more deaths among those given hydroxychloroquine versus standard care, according to the research.

Last week, the Drug Safety Commission cautioned against the use of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine for COVID-19 treatment outside of hospitals or clinical trials because of the risk of heart rhythm problems.

"Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have not been shown to be safe and effective for treating or preventing COVID-19. Both can cause abnormal heart rhythms and a dangerously rapid heart rate,” cautioned The Drug and Safety Commission in a statement.

The FDA explicitly warned consumers not to buy the drugs from online pharmacies without a prescription from a health care professional.

The FDA hopes this communication brings an end to the confusion about the unsubstantiated claims about the two drugs.

They claims began with tiny anecdotal studies in China and made their way to the White House, where the president repeatedly suggested the drugs might help, adding, “What have you got to lose?”

The answer from the FDA: There’s a possibility you could lose you life through cardiac arrest.

The News4Jax Trust Index deems the claim that the drugs are effective is the fight against coronavirus false based on this new communique from the FDA.

Not True

After review, we've found this information is Not True.


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