Smart food swaps for a healthier Thanksgiving

Americans eat roughly 4500 calories during a Thanksgiving gathering. That's almost twice the recommended daily calorie intake. All that extra food can mean more weight added to the scale. But there are a few simple ways to make your favorite holiday food healthier.

Americans eat about 4,500 calories during a Thanksgiving gathering. That is about twice the recommended daily calorie intake. All those extra calories can mean more pounds. There are some simple ways to make your favorite not-so-healthy holiday foods, healthier.

Thanksgiving is about family, friends, and food, lots of food.

And all that gravy can add up to extra pounds pretty quickly.

Holistic cardiologist Mona Shaw shares some healthier choices. For deviled eggs switch out the mayonnaise with olive oil or yogurt. Better yet…

“Scoop out the yolk, uh, mix avocado in there and make a guacamole and put it back in there,” said Dr. Mona Shaw, a holistic cardiologist at Baptist Health.

For mashed potatoes, mix half mashed potatoes with half mashed cauliflower.

“That’s 50% less of the carb part,” Shaw said.

As for the sweet potato casserole, forget the butter, sugar, or honey; roast them and add a little pumpkin pie spice and nutmeg.

“You’ll still get the flavor,” Shaw said.

For an even tastier green bean casserole, Shaw suggested.

“Why not just roast them with a little bit of almonds on it or garlic and you know, put a little balsamic vinegar and oil,” Shaw said.

And always opt for turkey.

“Turkey, which is like a leaner, you know, than having ham with all the extra sodium,” Shaw said.

What about eggnog? One cup can cost you up to 350 calories and is loaded with saturated fat and added sugars.

“If you wanna do eggnog, there’s a brand called Califia, they make an almond milk eggnog. It’s actually pretty good, but it’s lower fat, lower sugars,” Shaw said.

With a few healthy food swaps to help your waistline survive the holidays.

Another good tip, use a small plate. A Cornell University study found reducing your plate size can lead to a 30% reduction in food consumption.