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Florida auto museum covers Confederate flag on General Lee

Move comes after TV Land pulls 'Dukes of Hazzard'

The Miami Auto Museum at the Dezer Collection has acquired an unprecedented number of antique, luxury, rare and iconic cars from movies and television, but thanks to the reignited debate over the Confederate flag, one car is causing controversy.
The Miami Auto Museum at the Dezer Collection has acquired an unprecedented number of antique, luxury, rare and iconic cars from movies and television, but thanks to the reignited debate over the Confederate flag, one car is causing controversy.

MIAMI – It is one of the most prestigious car collections in the world. The Miami Auto Museum at the Dezer Collection has acquired an unprecedented number of antique, luxury, rare and iconic cars from movies and television, but thanks to the reignited debate over the Confederate flag, one car is causing controversy.

The General Lee from the 1970's show, the "Dukes of Hazard" is proudly displayed on the museum floor.

The network TV Land has already pulled reruns of the show due to sensitivity toward the Confederate flag, which is painted on the roof. Also, the debate and civil disobedience surrounding its presence on capital grounds in South Carolina is at high octane levels.

"You guys have to call before coming -- this is the second time," an employee at the museum told WPLG-TV reporter Todd Tongen.

"We called, but you won't take our appointment," Tongen said.

"So if we won't take your appointment, we don't want you guys to come in," the employee said.

WPLG-TV wanted to see one of the 256 1969 Dodge Chargers used in the filming of the show, but museum staff would not let us in.

When photographer Donnie Dallas paid his $40 admission, he was surprised to see a piece of paper covering the flag on the roof, although they missed the confederate license plate.

"Why did you put a sheet of paper over the top?" Tongen asked an employee.

"Because that is what we were told to do," the employee said.

"By your managers?" asked Tongen.

"Call the legal department," the employee said.

Museum officials said they had no comment on the controversy regarding the Confederate flag, and said they are subject to a strict licensing agreement with Warner Brothers.