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Gov. Scott activates Florida Disaster Fund

Fund is a provate fund to assist communities

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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida Governor Rick Scott activated the Florida Disaster Fund following Sunday's terror attack in Orlando.

The Florida Disaster Fund helps provide financial support to organizations that serve survivors, their families, and all those in need.

“We are committed to ensuring that every resource is available to help those in need following yesterday’s horrific terror attack in Orlando. Since the attack, we have seen Floridians unite together and our state has received an incredible outpouring of prayers and support. Activating the Florida Disaster Fund will give individuals across the country the opportunity to assist survivors and the loved ones of the victims. We will continue to work together in the coming days to do all we can to help this community heal,” Scott said.

The Florida Disaster Fund is the State of Florida’s official private fund established to assist Florida’s communities as they respond to and recover during times of emergency or disaster. In partnership with the public sector, private sector and other non-governmental organizations, the Florida Disaster Fund supports response and recovery activities. There is no overhead funding; 100% of funds raised will go toward those in need. Donations to the Florida Disaster Fund are made to the Volunteer Florida Foundation, 501(c)(3) charitable organization and are tax deductible.

Donations may be made by credit card on the secure website www.floridadisasterfund.org or by check to the below address. 

Checks should be made payable to the Volunteer Florida Foundation and should include “Florida Disaster Fund” in the memo line.

Volunteer Florida Foundation
Attention: Florida Disaster Fund
3800 Esplanade Way, Suite 180
Tallahassee, FL  32311

While many have been inspired to give what they can in the wake of the Orlando tragedy, state officials are warning Floridians to be cautious. Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam’s office wants people to make sure they’re giving to a reputable organization. He says too often people are scammed when they are sometimes at their lowest point.

“It is fairly common, in the aftermath of a tragic event like this for people to further pray on good hearted individuals emotions and rip them off by creating a charity that has no intention of sending the money to the victims or the victims families or anything related to the incident,” Putnam said.

You can research registered charities in the state by visiting freshfromflorida.com