75ºF

Supreme Court rules against Texas abortion access law

First hearing in challenge to Florida's abortion law set for Wednesday

But according to Billy J. Williams, the acting U.S. attorney in Oregon, the Hammonds were rightfully convicted after setting fire to about 130 acres of public land in an attempt to cover up poaching. In an opinion piece for the Burns Times Herald,
But according to Billy J. Williams, the acting U.S. attorney in Oregon, the Hammonds were rightfully convicted after setting fire to about 130 acres of public land in an attempt to cover up poaching. In an opinion piece for the Burns Times Herald, (creationc/FreeImages)

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – The U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to anti-abortion supporters Monday with a ruling against a Texas abortion access law. The high court’s ruling could have implications in Florida.

A challenge to Florida’s abortion law is set to get its first hearing in federal court Wednesday. Opponents of the law seek an injunction to keep it from going into effect July 1.

Florida lawmakers passed a law earlier this year hitting abortion clinics with tougher regulations. Abortion doctors would need hospital admitting privileges or clinics would have to have a transfer agreement with a hospital close by.

A similar law in Texas forced around 20 of the state’s abortion clinics to shut down. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-3 against that law Monday.

Pro-choice groups see it as a win.

"We are very excited from this ruling," said Kimberly Diaz, of Planned Parenthood. "This could mean that a lot of the legislation that we anticipated that could possibly restrict access to abortion here in Florida is now deemed unconstitutional."

Justices ruled the Texas law was an undue burden on abortion access. But the Florida Catholic Conference said the decision hurts women’s care.

"We are disappointed with the decision because even though we uphold the dignity of life from conception, we do realize that some women choose abortion, and those women should have a higher quality of care," said Ingrid Delgado, of the Florida Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Supporters of the Florida bill think it’s different enough from the one in Texas that it will stand up.