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Texas man writes humorous obituary about father

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(Photo courtesy Victoria Advocate)

LOLITA, Texas – If you were to write an obituary about a loved one, what would you say? You most likely wouldn't refer to him or her as having a "rickety old body."

A man from Bay City paid tribute to his father in a unique way, writing a humorous description of his father and the way he lived his life.

Howard Wayne Neal died on Sept. 11. Neal's son, Eric Neal, wrote his father's obituary in the Victoria Advocate, which is making loved ones and even those who never met him chuckle.

"Wayne Neal has exited his rickety old body, having lived twice as long as he expected and way longer then he deserved," Eric wrote. "He often wished in his later years that he had not treated his body like a Tavern. Wayne never met a man he didn't want to Indian leg wrestle, or play mercy with. Mainly because he was an ornery ole bastard."

According to the obituary, Neal was considered the best concrete contractor in all of Texas. Eric also mentioned some of his father's passions.

"He had a passion for old cars, scotch, his construction company, scotch, travel and oh yeah scotch. Did we mention scotch?"

While a person's child or children are usually named in an obituary, that was not the case for Neal.

"He is survived by his favorite son Buddy and another kid, some grandchildren, a few more great grandchildren, a trilogy of brothers, and one sister," Eric wrote. And by the way, Buddy is actually his dog. We can only assume that "another kid" is Eric.

Dozens of people, both family and friends, commented on the obituary, even people Neal did not know.

"Awesome obituary! Didn't know him but after reading it, felt like I did! Bet his favorite son had something to do with it! A life well lived, man he Rest In Peace!" Helen Delgado Loya wrote.

"Eric Neal, thank you for putting this out there! Didn't know your dad, but sure wish I could have met him. He sounds like quite the wonderful character," Patti Farquhar Schobey wrote.

"This makes me smile, even though my heart is sad. I love all my memories of Uncle Wayne and will always treasure a stuffed seal that he bought me when I was little and we were in Galveston," Jacque Neal Dundas wrote.

Someone in the comments asked Eric if he had helped his father write the obituary. Eric replied: "Wayne made the story, I just put it on paper,"