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Jacksonville program saving lives of opioid addicts

Councilman Bill Gulliford

1. Hope for the opioid crisis:It's no secret that opioid deaths and overdoses are at crisis levels in the US. However, 2019 may bring new ways of fighting this epidemic. Every year, the Cleveland Clinic releases the most important medical advancements for the coming year, and at the top of its list for 2019 is alternative pain management therapies. Not to mention, the federal government is taking steps to curb the problem and help those who need it.
1. Hope for the opioid crisis:It's no secret that opioid deaths and overdoses are at crisis levels in the US. However, 2019 may bring new ways of fighting this epidemic. Every year, the Cleveland Clinic releases the most important medical advancements for the coming year, and at the top of its list for 2019 is alternative pain management therapies. Not to mention, the federal government is taking steps to curb the problem and help those who need it. (CNN)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – The city got some encouraging news Tuesday in Jacksonville's battle to stem the opioid crisis. City Councilman Bill Gulliford, who has spearheaded efforts to fight the addictive drug said the number of overdose deaths appears to have gone down.

Some local doctors said it's the result of a new program called Project Save Lives being used in several emergency rooms. The city-funded project funds a recovery peer specialist -- a former addict who is professionally trained -- to give the recover options for treatment after they are discharged from the ER.

"We address the addiction right there in the emergency room," Gulliford said. "We stabilize them. We stop the cravings many times are being released still withdrawing. And what are they do they just go back out and look for more."

To learn more about the program, visit Project Save Lives.


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