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Georgia COVID-19 cases pass 3,000; death rise to 102

A nurse holds a swabs and test tube kit to test people for COVID-19, the disease that is caused by the new coronavirus, at a drive through station set up in a hospital parking lot.
A nurse holds a swabs and test tube kit to test people for COVID-19, the disease that is caused by the new coronavirus, at a drive through station set up in a hospital parking lot. (Paul Sancya/AP)

The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus has passed the 3,000 mark in Georgia while deaths from the virus continue to rise.

As of 7 p.m. Monday, the number of cases had risen to 3,032 (up 223 from noon Monday), with the number of coronavirus-related deaths now at 102 (up 15). Officials said 773 patients (up 66) were hospitalized due to the virus.

While the highest concentration of cases continues to be in metropolitan Atlanta, where Fulton County’s 503 cases by far the highest number in the state, 129 of Georgia’s 159 counties reported at least one positive result. The most deaths (18) have occurred in Dougherty County in Southwest Georgia.

Monday night, DPH identified eight more cases in Southeast Georgia -- seven in Glynn County, bringing that caseload up to 17, and one in Camden County, bringing that caseload up to four. No deaths have been reported in Southeast Georgia.

Of the cases confirmed since testing began, 57% of patients were between the ages of 18 and 59 while 35% of patients were 60 or older.

As of Monday evening, 13,457 tests have been performed in Georgia, according to DPH.

According to the Georgia Department of Health, the youngest person to die from the virus is a 31-year-old DeKalb County man. The oldest has been a 95-year-old Baker County man.

On Sunday, President Donald Trump issued a disaster declaration for Georgia, freeing up federal resources to help the state’s COVID-19 response.

DPH says it is working closely with the CDC, and state partners to respond to an outbreak of COVID-19 in the U.S., including Georgia. The goal is to quickly identify cases of COVID-19 and take the appropriate public health action to reduce its spread and protect the general public.

Public health officials have urged social distancing to slow down or stop the spread of coronavirus. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults who are 60+ and people with serious medical conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, are at higher risk of getting very sick from coronavirus.


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