8 months later, Jacksonville mother still waiting for answers in son's death

Tradarius Alexander, 18, found dead on Detroit Street in July

By Destiny McKeiver - Multi-media journalist

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - Eight months have passed since a Jacksonville mother last saw her teenage son alive. 

In July, Tradarius Alexander, 18, was found dead from a gunshot wound in the middle of Detroit Street near Commonwealth Avenue in the city's Woodstock neighborhood.

"This feeling that I have, I wouldn't wish this on anyone," his mother, Ralaunda Bray, said through tears. "No one should have to bury their baby, especially when they're taken and left on the side of the road like he was."

Bray told News4Jax on Thursday that police have been getting tips from the public, but not enough information to make an arrest. 

"Neighbors heard the gunshots. They heard commotion," she said. "But as far as having a witness or anything, no one has come forth yet."

Bray said she believes those who know something are afraid of retaliation, which is why nearly a year has passed and no arrests have been made. 

The mother said she keeps reminders of her son. On the back of her car is a special tribute to her son. She also still has the earrings that she had specially made when Alexander was killed.

"I don't think I'll ever be the same because that day, my life did change," Bray said. "I have to remain strong though because he has three brothers and they loved him, so I have to be strong for them."

Alexander lived less than a half mile from where he was found dead. What makes the situation even more eerie, Bray said, is the fact that she drove down Detriot Street the morning her son's body was found on July 9.

"Knowing that my son laid on the side of a road, taking his last breath by himself, that kills me," she said.

Anyone with information can anonymously call Crime Stoppers at 1-866-845-TIPS. 

News4Jax crime and safety analyst Gil Smith said the news stories help in some cases, and police gather a lot of evidence during the investigation because they never know what technology could be used in the future to help solve a case. 

He said homicide cases are never closed until they're solved. 

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