EXPLAINER: How do I know when to get my 2nd vaccine shot?

FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020 file photo, a county health department worker fills out a vaccination record card before administering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to emergency medical workers and healthcare personnel at the Chester County Government Services Center in West Chester, Pa. The first coronavirus vaccines in the U.S. require two shots taken weeks apart, and you'll be given a record card so you know when to go back for the second dose. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020 file photo, a county health department worker fills out a vaccination record card before administering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to emergency medical workers and healthcare personnel at the Chester County Government Services Center in West Chester, Pa. The first coronavirus vaccines in the U.S. require two shots taken weeks apart, and you'll be given a record card so you know when to go back for the second dose. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

NEW YORK – As U.S. health officials try to get COVID-19 vaccines to people more quickly, it’s already time for some people to get their second shots.

So who's keeping track to make sure you get the correct second dose, and on time? And who can see that information?

It’s one of the many logistical issues health officials have been sorting out to pull off the country’s largest vaccination campaign. The first COVID-19 vaccines available in the U.S. require two doses taken weeks apart. Other vaccines in the pipeline might not require two doses, but the record keeping for those would work the same way.

Here’s a look at how vaccinations are being tracked.

WHAT'S NEEDED FOR MY FIRST SHOT?

Once vaccines become widely available in coming months, the pharmacy, health clinic or doctor's office where you get your shot will ask for basic information, such as your name, date of birth and gender.

You might also be asked for other information, such as your race and any health condition that could put you at higher risk for a severe case of COVID-19. But exactly what you're asked about will vary depending on where you go.

The shots are free, but you'll likely be asked for your insurance information if you have it.