If college football is played, will bowls be salvaged, too?

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FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2018, file photo, Alabama place kicker Andy Pappanastos misses a field goal during the second half of the NCAA college football playoff championship game against Georgia in Atlanta. There are more bowl games scheduled for the coming season than ever before in major college football: 42, not including the College Football Playoff championship. College football leaders are in the process of piecing together plans to attempt to play a regular season during the COVID-19 pandemic. If it is even possible, everyone anticipates there will be disruptions, added expenses and loads of stress just to get through it. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

College football leaders are in the process of piecing together plans for a regular season during the COVID-19 pandemic.

If it is possible to play, everyone anticipates there will be disruptions, added expenses and loads of stress just to get through it.

So how motivated will schools be to tack on a postseason game after all that? Especially one that doesn't determine a national title?

“You've got to think they'll be such a heightened sensitivity to adding another opportunity that doesn’t contribute to something else," Notre Dame athletic director Jack Swarbrick said. “I imagine the top bowls will want to try and still do it. But you've got to wonder if the schools will be willing to play. You made it through the regular season and now your going to add another event that adds complexity and cost.”

There are more bowl games scheduled for the coming season than ever before in major college football: 42, not including the College Football Playoff championship. Less than five months away from bowl season, most of them don't even have a date locked in yet. If the regular season can be saved, can the postseason be salvaged, too?

"I have yet to hear one thought on the part of any of the conferences that they would have a regular season and not have a postseason,” said Nick Carparelli, the new executive director of the Football Bowl Association.

At the top of the postseason hierarchy is the playoff. The semifinals are scheduled to to be played Jan. 1 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, and te Sugar Bowl in New Orleans. The championship game is set for Jan. 11 at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.

As of now, none of that has changed, CFP executive director Bill Hancock said.