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Another try for weather satellite launch

Extended forecasts to improve after operation

The Joint Polar Satellite System, will launch November 14th putting the nation's most advanced low Earth polar-orbiting weather satellite into space.
The Joint Polar Satellite System, will launch November 14th putting the nation's most advanced low Earth polar-orbiting weather satellite into space. (NOAA)

LOMPOC, Ca. – Forecasters use many tools to predict the weather and satellites play a key role in observing weather to jumpstart forecast models.

A new NOAA satellite will launch Tuesday morning from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 4:47 a.m. EST.

It's called the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1), and what sets this apart from the recent GOES 16 satellite is JPSS-1 is the first in a new series of four highly advanced NOAA polar-orbiting satellites that circle the Earth, from north pole to south pole, over and over as it spins.

It travels so fast that, in a 24-hour period, it circles the planet 14 times providing a full weather picture of the globe twice a day! GOES satellites are locked in one spot much higher above the planet.

JPSS-1 is expected to increase weather forecast accuracy from three to seven days.

But beyond weather analysis and forecasting, the satellite will provide data for climate research and prediction, global sea surface temperature measurements, atmospheric soundings of temperature and humidity, ocean dynamics research, volcanic eruption monitoring, forest fire detection, global vegetation analysis, search and rescue.

The launch was rescheduled from November 10th. 

If you are up early, live streaming and blog updates will begin at 4:15 a.m. EST Nov. 14 as the countdown occurs. You can follow coverage on the NASA launch blog at https://blogs.nasa.gov/jpss. 


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