It costs more to sleep better at night

Jacksonville's rising temperatures hit electric bills

The warming trend in Jacksonville has resulted in higher cooling costs over the decades.
The warming trend in Jacksonville has resulted in higher cooling costs over the decades.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Your electric bills are getting higher with Jacksonville's warming climate. And if you decide to turn off the air conditioning, be prepared to have a restless sleep. 

Experts at sleepfoundation.org say their research shows people sleep best in a room cooled around 65 degrees. 

But as temperatures continue to climb, people may suffer from restless sleep or see a boost in the electric bills if they run the air conditioning longer.

According to the Energy Information Administration, AC is the largest part of residential electricity use -- costing almost $450 a year in the south.

An analysis by Climate Central found that 87 percent of U.S. cities are experiencing more warm nights since 1970. 

Across the south, El Paso has the largest increase of warmer than 65 degree nights. Sarasota and Tampa both had 43 nights. 

Cooling degree days in Jacksonville are higher than average. This is the concept used to estimate the amount of artificial cooling  to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature.

The degree days aren't actually days at all but represent the number of degrees the daily average temperature is above 65°F.

For Jacksonville, demand for cooling has surged to its second largest percentage increase ever in just the past 10 years.

So far in 2018, the city has accumulated 171 degrees days above its average. 


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