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MOCA hosting discussion on First Coast climate change impacts

Exhibit photos show global climate change perils

Floodwaters of Black Creek from Hurricane Irma recede after topping the previous high water mark by about seven feet.
Floodwaters of Black Creek from Hurricane Irma recede after topping the previous high water mark by about seven feet. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla – Photos on display at MOCA from an internationally acclaimed photographer show climate change's impact on the First Coast and provides a backdrop for a panel discussion on local environment change tonight. 

Recent years, Jacksonville and the surrounding areas, have been hit with record heat, massive fires in the Okefenokee, flooding and intense hurricanes.

This is the fingerprint of climate change impacting Jacksonville: not a direct cause but a mechanism enflaming deadly wildfires, heat waves and worsening hurricane catastrophes.

Scientists are not surprised. Just last week the government authored a long-awaited report with an unmistakable message. 

Numerous federal agencies report they are more certain than ever about evidence showing climate change exists and that it poses a severe threat to the country’s infrastructure and natural resources which will be costly.

When Hurricane Irma caused record flooding in the St. Johns river and Black Creek, world renowned photographer Gideon Mendel captured images of the Jacksonville area in the aftermath.

This became part of his project called Drowning World. 

Photos of the Drowning World project and his video, Deluge, are on display showing flooding across thirteen different countries and the individual stories of people suffering from climate change.

The first event, “Climate and People: How Will Our Communities Survive?” runs from 6 to 7 p.m. on Thursday night, Nov. 29.

The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) is set to host another panel discussion on December 5th highlighting the state of our waters around Jacksonville and Northeast Florida.


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