89ºF

Amazing weather pictures from space

Satellite images capture awesome 2019 events

Shadow from a solar eclipse on July 2, 2019 shows over the south Pacific west of Chile.
Shadow from a solar eclipse on July 2, 2019 shows over the south Pacific west of Chile. (NOAA)

A new year is upon us and the weather events to unfold will likely be just as interesting from a space view as in 2019.

Many of the images below were captured from a satellite over 22-thousand miles up in space showcasing a year filled with fires, hurricanes, and interesting atmospheric cloud processes.

It was a year of record-breaking tropical cyclones—in both the Atlantic and Pacific.

The eye of major Hurricane Dorian approaching Abaco Island, Bahamas, on September 1, 2019, as seen by NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite.
The eye of major Hurricane Dorian approaching Abaco Island, Bahamas, on September 1, 2019, as seen by NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite. (NOAA)

Many parts of the globe were ravaged by wildfires in 2019 including fires that burned north of San Francisco.

The massive smoke plume from California’s Kincade Fire was seen stretching hundreds of miles away from the blaze by NOAA’s GOES-17 satellite, on October 27, 2019.
The massive smoke plume from California’s Kincade Fire was seen stretching hundreds of miles away from the blaze by NOAA’s GOES-17 satellite, on October 27, 2019. (NOAA)

NOAA’s new cutting-edge satellite, GOES-17, became operational in 2019 which captured winter marine stratus clouds trapped by an inversion around the big island of Hawaii.

NOAA’s GOES-17 satellite watched as billowing clouds formed around Hawaii’s Big Island on January 15, 2019.
NOAA’s GOES-17 satellite watched as billowing clouds formed around Hawaii’s Big Island on January 15, 2019. (NOAA)

Residents of the Southern Hemisphere were treated to a rare total solar eclipse on July 2, 2019. In this loop, NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite is tracking the Moon’s shadow across the Southern Pacific and South America.

.
.

On August 26, 2019, NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite watched as one of the largest dust plumes of the year blew over the Atlantic Ocean from the Sahara Desert.

African Dust flows west in the tan colors.
African Dust flows west in the tan colors. (NOAA)

About the Author: