59ºF

Rubio takes aim at Senate seat

Expected to announce bid this week

Ahead of Florida?s primary, polls showed front-runner Donald Trump ahead of Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. Rubio has been urging constituents to vote for him, saying a vote for John Kasich or Sen. Ted Cruz is a vote for Trump.
Ahead of Florida?s primary, polls showed front-runner Donald Trump ahead of Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. Rubio has been urging constituents to vote for him, saying a vote for John Kasich or Sen. Ted Cruz is a vote for Trump. (Scott Olson/Getty)


WASHINGTON – Florida Senator Marco Rubio's campaign for the White House may have fizzled, but now there's word he could be returning to the senate.

 

This comes after Rubio said he would be leaving Washington for good. Concern was growing among the Republicans that they could lose their Senate majority.

 

Analysts say if Rubio does announce his bid for reelection, Republicans could get a second chance.

 

"With Republican candidates in the race, they are not fairing very well to the Democrat opponent," News4Jax Political Analyst Jennifer Carroll said. "They're for Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump and have been encouraging Marco Rubio that they will be behind him financially if he should go back in his seat to run."

 

Carroll said Rubio's potential run doesn't comes as much of a surprise, but adds he could face some challenges.

 

"The problem for Rubio will be, can he overcome what was stated for months that he did not like the senate, as it was reported by people close to him," Carroll said.

 

Strategists working key Senate races in Ohio, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and New Hampshire are looking at the potential candidate for trouble.

 

Donald Trump's numbers are reportedly down in those states. That's leading some to worry Rubio could drag Senate incumbents.

 

But Carroll said a Rubio boost from Florida could change the game if he plays his cards right.

 

"In the state we have more registered Democrats than Republicans. So he will have to go into that middle of the road," Carroll said. "The Independents and Republicans would have to woo them over."


About the Authors: