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'Lil D' arrested after victim of double shooting near Stanton dies

Deonta Clark has previous arrests, including a gang-related charge


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – A 22-year-old man is charged with second-degree murder in connection with Friday's exchange of gunfire in the Durkeeville neighborhood that police said began with a dispute over a girl.

The Jacksonville Sheriff's Office announced Monday that 19-year-old Raynard Hayward died in the gunfire. Deonta Clark, also known as Lil D, was arrested in the shooting on West 16th Street near Myrtle Avenue that prompted a lockdown at nearby Stanton College Preparatory School.

Police said they have identified a second gunman and have a warrant for his arrest.

According to the police report, Clark told Hayward, "You think I won't?" before he pulled a gun and shot Hayward at least three times -- shooting after the victim had already fallen on the ground. According to police, a friend of Hayward then pulled a gun and fired back, hitting Clark in the arm.

Clark ran behind a convenience store and then behind a house before he got in a private car and was driven to UF Health Jacksonville, according to police. Hayward arrived at UF Health in a separate car, where he later died.

Police said they have surveillance video of Clark bleeding and holding a gun and a bloody firearm was found at behind that house where Clark was seen.

Police said the second gunman will be charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, but that person is not in custody and the name was not released.

Clark has previous arrests for carrying a concealed firearm, possession of a weapon by a gang-related felon, resisting officer, possession of drugs and failure to appear in court.

Police said Friday's shooting was not gang-related.

Clark's mother, Hope Taylor, said she doesn't like her son being labeled a murderer, because he is not.

"He has been in that area for the past 10 years. How are you going to label him because he is in a neighborhood with other fellows?" Taylor said. "We raise our kids to be a certain way, but doesn’t mean they are going to go that way. We shouldn’t uphold our kids in the wrong. It they are wrong. They are wrong."


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