Florida ‘dreamers’ hail high court ruling on DACA

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students gather in front of the Supreme Court on Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trumps effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students gather in front of the Supreme Court on Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. The Supreme Court on Thursday rejected President Donald Trumps effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants, a stunning rebuke to the president in the midst of his reelection campaign. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

A split U.S. Supreme Court ruling Thursday that upheld federal protections for young undocumented immigrants reverberated throughout Florida, a state that roughly 32,000 “Dreamers” call home.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, shields undocumented immigrants who were brought to the country as children from deportation and allows them to work in the U.S.

President Donald Trump’s administration has tried to dismantle the program, prompting lawsuits that resulted in Thursday’s 5-4 court decision.

Karen Caudillo, a DACA recipient who lives in Orlando, came to the U.S. with her parents as a 4-year-old, she told The News Service of Florida.

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Hearing about the court decision was an unexpected and emotional moment, Caudillo said, especially after talking to her mother, who is an undocumented immigrant from Mexico.

“My parents have sacrificed so much. This morning, my mom broke down in tears on Facetime and she was just like, all our sacrifices are worth it. You are invincible and don’t let anybody tell you that you don’t deserve to be in your home,” Caudillo, 24, said in a telephone interview.

Caudillo said she has been living under the federal program’s protection since 2013. The program was launched in 2012 by then-President Barack Obama.


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