FDA says some aren’t recommended to take COVID-19 vaccine

Nurse Melissa Valentin shows a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to be applied to medical personnel at the Ashford Presbyterian Community Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020. After a first lot of vaccines arrived to the island the first in line to be inoculated are health workers, emergency responders, hospital employees and those who live or work in shelters or nursing homes. (AP Photo / Carlos Giusti)
Nurse Melissa Valentin shows a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to be applied to medical personnel at the Ashford Presbyterian Community Hospital in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020. After a first lot of vaccines arrived to the island the first in line to be inoculated are health workers, emergency responders, hospital employees and those who live or work in shelters or nursing homes. (AP Photo / Carlos Giusti) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – When the FDA approved Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine, the medical community agreed it would help more people than not.

However, the vaccine is not recommended for everyone just yet. Here are the groups not recommended for Pfizer’s vaccine:

  • Anyone under the age of 16
  • Pregnant women
  • Women who are breast feeding
  • People with severe allergic reactions
  • People who are immunocompromised systems
Pregnant woman
Pregnant woman

Dr. Elizabeth Ransom, with Baptist Health, said that could change for people who fall in those groups. She said it’s just that right now there’s no data because no one who falls into these categories were included in the vaccine trials.

What about women who plan on getting pregnant in the near future?

“I think that’s a conversation for someone to have with her obstetrician, gynecologists,” Ransom said. “Of course, in the study there were some participants who did become pregnant, maybe they weren’t pregnant at the beginning of the study and throughout the course of the study -- and we haven’t heard any adverse effects of that.”

Ransom recommends if you fall into any of these groups to speak to your doctor directly about what you should do. It’s important to note that it could be months before a vaccine becomes available for widespread public use, and we’re going to learn more about the vaccines by then.


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