COVID pandemic tougher on women’s mental health, experts say

Isolation, stress or the loss of a loved one due to the COVID-19 pandemic are all having an effect on people’s wellbeing.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Isolation, stress or the loss of a loved one due to the COVID-19 pandemic are all having an effect on people’s wellbeing.

It’s been exactly one year since the official declaration of the pandemic, and mental health experts argue the mental toll on women has been worse compared to men.

“Mental health impact, in terms of depression and anxiety, was so much greater for women than for men, and the suicide rates are up disproportionately for women,” explained Dr. Shauna Springer, chief psychologist for Stella Center. “What’s really hard during this period of time, is because everybody is remote and sheltered in place, it’s really hard to get good data.”

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that as of January, more than 2.3 million women left the labor force since the beginning of the pandemic.

Additionally, it says more than two in five of the 12.2 million women’s jobs lost between February and April 2020 haven’t returned.

Stephanie Peyton, a licensed clinician and therapist who owns Anew Therapy, said that she has seen more women seeking help during the pandemic.

“With the addition of being in those roles, where financially, they haven’t recovered those jobs and are isolated at home with someone who may or may not be abusive, with children, that’s an impact that even as we start to recover in society, and be able to socialize more, those are things that are longer lasting,” Peyton said.

Peyton and Springer said there is hope this year to bring healing and change for how society addresses the needs of those who suffer from trauma and mental health issues.


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