wjxt logo

CDC considers updating fully-vaccinated definition to include a booster shot

Taking the recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses may no longer be enough to be considered "fully vaccinated" in the future. The CDC is considering updating its definition to include a booster shot.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – Taking the recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses may no longer be enough to be considered “fully vaccinated” in the future. The CDC is considering updating its definition to include a booster shot.

Despite this consideration, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky warns boosters aren’t a quick fix.

“We will not boost our way out of this pandemic, and no vaccine, even a booster vaccine provides 100 percent protection. So even after you boost it remains important for us to remain smart about our protection strategies while we still have over 93 percent of our counties with high or moderate community transmission,” said Dr. Rochelle Walensky.

Right now, boosters are recommended for those 65 years old or those considered high risk.

Meanwhile, vaccinations for children are moving forward.

Pfizer released new data showing its COVID-19 vaccine is about 90% effective against symptomatic coronavirus in children ages 5 to 11. The FDA will meet on Tuesday to discuss the findings.

“We will consider it. I can promise you that when we have this discussion that if we do end up recommending this vaccine, we would only do it if we would give it to our own children,” said Dr. Paul Offit, Vaccine Adviser with the US Food and Drug Administration.

If approved, vaccinations could begin in early November. The first children to receive their shots could be fully protected by Christmas.

So far, 57% of the United States population is fully vaccinated and only 6% received a booster shot.


About the Author:

This native of the Big Apple joined the News4Jax team in July 2021.