Family, friends of soldier killed by bear honor hometown hero from St. Augustine

Army sergeant remembered as ‘a true patriot’

The body of U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Seth Plant arrived Monday afternoon at Jacksonville International Airport from Alaska, where he died two weeks ago.

The body of U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Seth Plant arrived at the Jacksonville International Airport on Monday afternoon from Alaska, where he died two weeks ago.

Staff Sgt. Plant was killed by a brown bear while working in a training area on joint base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage.

The procession from the Jacksonville airport to St. Johns Family Funeral Home in St. Augustine was a long one, complete with tributes and people from all across Northeast Florida coming out to pay their respects.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Plant was killed by a brown bear while working in a training area on joint base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage. On Monday, there was a procession from Jacksonville International Airport to St. Johns Family Funeral Home in St. Augustine, complete with tributes and people from all across Northeast Florida coming out to pay their respects.

The plane carrying Sgt. Plant was met with water cannons and family members on the tarmac. Sgt. Plant’s body was accompanied by his parents and two sisters on the plane.

MORE: ‘He was a true patriot’: Family remembers Army sergeant from St. Augustine killed by bear in Alaska

Sgt. Plant was 30-years-old, and his family says he always wanted to serve his country. He served in Afghanistan and was awarded numerous medals and honors.

His family says he had been stationed in Alaska for the better part of the past year.

Monday on the tarmac, Sgt. Plant’s family hugged, prayed, and paid their respects -- the beginning of saying goodbye to their loved one.

The procession to the funeral home was led by the Freedom Riders.

Sgt. Plant’s family tells News4JAX he was loved by many—he was the life of the party, the baby of the family, with many friends in the area.

Sgt. Plant’s commander described him as a positive and dedicated leader who brought joy the paratroopers who served with him. The commander said Sgt. Plant always had a smile on his face and served as an inspiration to all who had the privilege to know him.

The procession went through Starke, where Sgt. Plant grew up until he was 10-years-old. He then moved to St. Augustine.

Sgt. Plant’s funeral is set for Saturday at Anastasia Baptist Church.


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I-TEAM and general assignment reporter