As new businesses open, others close amid inflation, supply chain issues

Consumer Price Index increased 8.5% in March

While new businesses open, it’s been hard for other businesses to stay afloat between supply chain issues and inflation.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – While new businesses open, it’s been hard for other businesses to stay afloat between supply chain issues and inflation.

There are reports that show people aren’t eating at restaurants as much. Some popular small businesses are making waves, while others are downsizing due to supply chain and labor shortages.

On Saturday, a line wrapped around the building of a new business in Jacksonville to satisfy a sweet tooth.

“We’re all about perfect experience when it comes to desserts,” said Andrea Plowden, co-owner of the Peach Cobbler Factory.

Businesses continue to open in Jacksonville despite rising inflation, supply chain issues and a loss of revenue since the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Consumer Price Index, or the prices of goods and services, increased 8.5% in March. The prices paid by wholesalers jumped 11.2%

It’s hurting businesses like Monroe’s Smokehouse Bar-B-Q, which announced Friday that it’ll be closing its Beach Boulevard location at the end of August.

“We have survived the worst of the pandemic, rising overhead and operational cost, labor shortages but it was an unforeseen major building repair cost that played a role in us having to make the exceedingly difficult decision,” owner Keith Monroe Waller said on Facebook.

The smokehouse’s location on Highway Avenue will stay open, and some staff will relocate there.

According to the National Restaurant Association, 96% of restaurants reported supply chain issues or shortages in recent months, 9 in 10 of them say food costs are higher than before COVID-19 and 7 in 10 don’t have enough staff.

While it’s up and down for some businesses, everyone is hoping for relief in some way.

According to the National Restaurant Association, 18% of restaurant operators say they expect economic conditions to improve in six months, while others say it’ll get worse or be the same.


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A Florida girl and North Carolina A&T SU grad who thrives in breaking news.