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Ask the Vet: Ensuring pet safety during Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is just days away, and we all want to include our pets in the festivities during the holidays.

Thanksgiving is one of the busiest times of the year for veterinarians because pets suffer from a variety of life-threatening, but preventable, ailments, so take a few simple precautions so you can have a safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving for the entire family, including the furry family members.

Dr. Barbara Bearden from the Clay Humane Society stopped by "The Morning Show" for our Ask the Vet segment on Tuesday.

She had some advice for pet parents to ensure pets stay safe this holiday.

  • Remember animals have different dietary needs and safety concerns than humans do.
  • Don't give pets turkey bones: While it is OK to share a little bit of turkey meat with your pets, never give your pet the entire bone. Turkey bones may splinter and get stuck in your pet's throat, windpipes or stomach.
  • Avoid new foods: Our tables might be filled with mashed potatoes, stuffing and cranberry sauce, but these foods can cause stomach distress for pets. Foods your pets are not accustomed to eating can even lead to pancreatitis, a swelling of the pancreas that is sometimes deadly. Do not give pets table foods and instead offer them treats designed for them.
  • Watch for poisonous foods: sSme foods are poisonous to pets like chocolate, onions, garlic, raisins, grapes and alcohol. Watch for poisonous ingredients in your holiday recipes and avoid giving these dishes to pets.
  • Give pets a quiet resting place: Holiday visitors can be overwhelming for pets. Pets can be upset by family, friends and other visitors coming in and out of the house on Thanksgiving. Give pets a safe place to relax such as a crate or a closed room with beds or towels to rest. Remember to also offer them plenty of food and water.
  • Know the names and addresses of emergency vets: If your pet becomes sick over Thanksgiving, make sure you know the names and addresses of nearby emergency veterinarians. If your pet appears lethargic, suffers diarrhea or vomiting or ingests a dangerous food, call the veterinarian for assistance.

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