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Georgia COVID-19 cases surpass 37,000

Southeast Georgia counties report 427 cases, 21 deaths

A medical healthcare worker drops a specimen collection into a container after testing a motorist for COVID-19 at a community testing site in the parking lot of La Flor de Jalisco #2 in Gainesville, Ga., Friday, May 15, 2020. (Alyssa Pointer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
A medical healthcare worker drops a specimen collection into a container after testing a motorist for COVID-19 at a community testing site in the parking lot of La Flor de Jalisco #2 in Gainesville, Ga., Friday, May 15, 2020. (Alyssa Pointer/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

As of Saturday afternoon, the Georgia Department of Public Health reported 37,147 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the state, up 466 from Friday afternoon.

As of 1 p.m. Saturday, there have been 1,592 deaths in Georgia attributed to the coronavirus, up 35 in the last day.

In the six Southeast Georgia counties tracked by News4Jax, there have been 427 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 21 deaths -- the highest concentration in Ware County.

For a full breakdown of all those Southeast Georgia counties, see the table below.

In the state of 10.6 million people, 321,069 COVID-19 tests have been conducted, the state reported Friday.

Georgia’s governor said he continues to see positive signs in the state’s battle against the coronavirus, even as the state’s death toll from the virus surpassed 1,500 and some health officials expressed concerns about the state’s aggressive plans to restart the economy.

Kemp eased a few restrictions this week on businesses and child care operations, but said he was keeping most current rules until at least the end of May.

The Republican governor reiterated that he believes Georgia is containing the COVID-19 respiratory illness, despite areas of concern.

Top health experts continue to warn that loosening restrictions too quickly could spark a resurgence of infections. Kemp has captured nationwide attention with his reopening moves because they were among the earliest and most aggressive.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms that clear up within weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness and be fatal.