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Georgia COVID-19 cases rise to 1097 as deaths increase to 38

There’s now 5 coronavirus cases confirmed in Glynn County

Coronavirus testing
Coronavirus testing (AP)

As the number of COVID-19 cases in Georgia reached 1,097, the number of COVID-19 deaths in the state increased to 38 as of Tuesday evening, according to the Georgia Department of Public Health.

Of the COVID-19 patients in Georgia, 361 have been hospitalized -- nearly 33%, state data shows.

On Tuesday, the number of reported coronavirus cases in Glynn County increased to five -- up one case from Monday afternoon.

Georgia’s cases also include a patient diagnosed with COVID-19 at Southeast Georgia Health Services’ Camden campus who is a Charlton County resident.

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Metro Atlanta still accounts for the largest overall number of cases, with Fulton County reporting more than 191 infections.

Of those who have tested positive in Georgia as of 7 p.m. Tuesday, 56% were between 18 and 59 years old, 35% were age 60 and up, 1% were age 17 or younger and 8% were of unknown age. Of the COVID-19 patients, 50% were female and 49% were male, with the gender unknown for the other 1%.

The state on Tuesday reported more than 1,000 cases after Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said Monday evening that he was issuing an executive order that will ban large gatherings across the state, close bars and nightclubs and order the medically fragile to shelter in place.

The order went into effect at noon Tuesday and will expire at noon on April 6.

Kemp also said the state has more than 23 referral-only testing sites that have been set up across the state to test residents for the coronavirus. The sites, which require a doctor’s note, are located in Brunswick, Savannah, Valdosta, Atlanta and other cities in the state.

For most people, the virus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe complications such as pneumonia. The vast majority recover.


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